How to Take Control Back in Your Hospital Pharmacy

EMS_CAP5Ref_Medical_Vending_MachineDrug diversion is an incredibly serious issue that is affecting a huge number of medical facilities across the country. According to a survey conducted by the Mayo Clinic in 2014, drug abuse among those in the general population runs at around 5% annually. The theory is that the number will actually be higher for medical professionals like pharmacy employees, however, because they have convenient access to the drugs that they seek. Now, many organizations are turning to technological advancements to help take back control in their hospital pharmacies once and for all.

The technology that is commonly employed to combat this type of issue involves a machine called an automated dispensing cabinet. Not only do hospitals and other facilities get the convenience that is associated with a medical vending machine, but they also have different layers of security to help deter drug theft and keep criminals at bay. Certain machines can have up to five different authorized access levels, for example, allowing employees instant access to only the products and items that are relevant to do their jobs on a daily basis. All relevant employee information can be recorded for each transaction, keeping a detailed record of who is checking out which item at what time.

One example of an organization that is using this type of technology to curb drug diversion and theft issues is UCapIt. With UCapIt’s Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispenser, for example, all transactions between an employee and a machine are individually tracked and reported. Not only does this help medical facilities keep a better eye on their inventory and alert them to situations where orders may need to be placed, but it also inserts a new level of accountability into the equation. If you always know who is checking out items, you know exactly who to turn to in the event that something goes missing.

With UCapIt’s solutions, EMS professionals can instantly check their hospital pharmacy inventory 24 hours a day, seven days a week – even from remote locations. Some of the security measures that are in place on these devices include fingerprint readers, barcode scanners, proximity card readers, unique PIN numbers and more.

Though drug theft is a major issue at many hospitals and pharmacies around the country, companies like UCapIt are doing everything in their power to put technology to good use  and ward off criminals once and for all. With automated dispensing solutions and  additional layers of security, organizations won’t have to worry about these types of issues much longer.

13 Year Old CEO Hopes to Bring His “RecMed First Aid Kits” to Vending Machines

7899804_GEMS supply vending machines configured to dispense a first aid kit on demand is the brainchild of 13-year-old CEO Taylor Rosenthal. Rosenthal’s company, RecMed First Aid Kits, was developed after a conversation with his parents who are both medical professionals and an opportunity presented by an entrepreneurial class at Opelika Middle School in Opelika, Alabama.

The kits contain basic medical supplies that could be useful to treat minor injuries on the sports field. Antibiotic sprays, bandages, adhesive tape, gauze pads and other first aid supplies come neatly packed in a clear plastic zippered case. Rosenthal has witnessed the need for such kits first-hand. “I mean I see it all the time…kids getting hurt at the ball fields playing baseball or something…and parents just go crazy…”

Rosenthal is working with The Round House Startup Space in Opelika to bring his dream first aid supply vending machines to fruition. According to Kyle Sandler, founder of The Round House, Rosenthal is a particularly devoted, hard-working CEO. Sandler had to essentially kick the teen out of the startup space to send him home on Christmas Eve to spend the holiday at home with his family.

Sandler also remarked that Rosenthal’s age affects how he views vending machines. According to Sandler, “… since he’s 13 and not 25… he’s more used to Redbox… so we made a couple of calls and now we have a computer-aided robotic vending machine in the works…” Eco ATM and RedBox have come on board to help Rosenthal get his product to market.

While sports fields were Rosenthal’s initial inspiration for the RecMed First Aid Kit vending machines, he doesn’t see athletic complexes as the solitary market for his product. He believes that anywhere families gather for recreation would present a feasible marketplace. He is already in talks with Six Flags Amusement Parks officials to places RecMed vending machines in the parks to deal with the minor cuts and scrapes that young children are so prone to.

Rosenthal advanced to the Young Entrepreneurs Academy regional semifinals in Boca Raton in May 2015.

Source:

http://www.wltz.com/story/29172406/opelika-teen-competing-in-the-young-entrepreneurs-academy-regional-finals

ASU Student Health Center Does Not Live Up To Student Demands

asu imageOne of the many positive attributes of the Student Health Center at ASU has to do with how forward thinking the people that run it actually are. Not only does it allow students to make appointments on the Internet, but it also features both pharmaceutical vending machines and advanced medical procedures that are not available in any other similar location in the area.

Despite this, however, a recent study that was conducted realized that the ASU Student Health Center is still not living up to the demands of the students that actually go there, regardless of how advanced the facility may be on paper.

One of the many issues that students from ASU have to deal with involves longer than average wait times for the services they need, even if they’ve used the online portal to make the necessary appointment ahead of time. The director of the facility, Allan Markus, indicated that this was a problem with the building’s construction and had nothing to do with staffing or other types of services offered. The building was last expanded in 1969, he says, and simply does not offer the space required to meet up with the demands of the expanding school around it.

Things have not improved very much for the students since 2011. According to StatePress.com, the average appointment for a non-specialist is usually averaging around four days. More than that, the average time that a student has to wait to register for an appointment at all can be over an hour and a half in some extreme circumstances.

The facility is also in something of a Catch-22 situation. All modifications to the center are handled via fees that are billed to student accounts. Because there are too many students to handle, the quality of the service that the students are literally paying for by way of tuition is suffering as a result. At that point, it becomes a bit of a self-fulfilling prophecy that is hard to break away from.

One of the ways in which ASU Student Health Center officials could relieve many of these issues, however, has to do with a wider adoption of medical vending machines across the facility. College medical vending machines are a great way to automate certain processes that used to take a great deal of time, money and energy to see through. If a student was coming into the facility to fill a prescription, for example, they wouldn’t necessarily have to wait in such a long line in order to do so.

Medical vending machines can also be a great boost to the staff, as they provide easy access to the important types of equipment that they are likely to use while treating students on a daily basis.

Benefits of Using Pharmaceutical Vending Machines

pharmaceutical vending machineAn average U.S. adult takes more than 11 prescription medications, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation, and senior citizens fill more than 31 prescriptions annually. The need for prescriptions contributes to the high cost of medical care, but some companies have found a way to circumvent the middle man.

Pharmaceutical dispensing machines for stable patients receiving prescriptions for diagnosed illnesses is becoming a cost and time saving solution. This prescription dispenser machine allows consumers to pick up prescriptions after hours, which can be helpful for busy individuals and families to avoid long lines and lengthy conversations in the traditional pharmacy.

The Process

The process for filling a prescription at a healthcare medical vending machine is not much different compared with a traditional pharmacy prescription. A consumer phones a pharmacy to order a prescription. A pharmacist fills the prescription and adds it to a vending machine where a consumer can pick it up, using a passcode, and paying with a credit or debit card.

Other pharmaceutical vending machines will accept prescriptions from the patient. These machines are used overseas and in the U.S., which can be advantageous for busy hospitals, clinics, pharmacies and rural communities that have less access to medical care. Pharmaceutical supplies can also be among the vending machine products.

Some pharmaceutical vending machine companies require the patient to speak with a pharmacist by video-phone before the prescription can be dispensed.

The Advantages

While the traditional pharmacist is helpful in the cases when a patient is prescribed a new, unfamiliar drug, because she can help explain potential side effects and discuss any concerns, a familiar drug obtained by refill may not require the human interaction element. Bypassing it with a pharmaceutical dispenser machine can save time and money, and improve customer service through a patient-centered model.

Other advantages include removing the barrier to patients feeling empowered to handle health-related matters more independently.

EMS Medical Supply Shortages: A Solution

UCapIT_1Within the medical industry, pharmacy inventory is in a high-stakes gamble with supply shortages. A medical vending machine is important for local paramedics, and several townships have installed machines capable of dispensing drugs and equipment—rather than the traditional snack food and beverages.

The Columbus Dispatch has featured such inclusions within their depiction of a pharmaceutical vending machine providing innovative solutions for emergency medical supplies, combating cost increases with locally provided medication and pharmaceuticals.

Instant Supply and Quick Medical Inventory Solutions

Each EMS medical vending machine provides a variety of solutions for ailments acknowledged by the Food and Drug Administration, alerting paramedics when stocked equipment or drugs are in low supply. Additionally, soon-to-expire substances are returned to distributors—exchanged for credit.

Revolutionary Design

Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispensers utilize updated tracking and inventory tracking technology. This technology delivers a number of processes, optimizing the machine for use and substance maintenance:

  •         EMS supply tracking
  •         Instant medication expense recording
  •         Control and monitoring of inventory
  •         Usage transparency

Each Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispenser enables and empowers EMS professionals—granting them instant access of units on a 24/7 basis. Intensive identification protocols are utilized, securing the unit through several mechanisms:

  •         Proximity card reader
  •         Pin number
  •         Bar code identification scanner
  •         Biometric fingerprint reader
  •         Combination lock mechanism

Regulation and Industry Security

Every system withdraw is cataloged, regulated and time stamped through individual use. Authority level clearance is always tight, so industry regulations are kept intact throughout servicing. Additionally, every Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispenser may be streamlined to access email notifications—contacting management when controlled substances are dispensed.

Such boundaries are available with simple inclusions: internet access and a laptop. Managers across the world can access, manage and utilize a variety of Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispenser items, each located within a variety of locations.

Restock Awareness and Recording

Within the industry, up-to-date inventories are vital, and expenses within pharmaceutical realms have been reduced to mere hundreds of dollars where CAP machines are utilized—replacing the previous multiple-thousand-dollar expenses ambulances and hospitals normally incurred.

When authorized staff identification has been established, CAP machines may be programmed to provide a number of functions, including:

  •         Vehicle-specified access
  •         Incident-specific access
  •         Witness identification approval

Often, an EMS Manager is required during unlocking and dispensing, ensuring control over narcotic kits, oxygen, laptops and back boards. Where storeroom security and accountability are concerned, CAP machines effectively regulate usage, expiration rates and location.

A Future of Consistency

Pharmaceutical and emergency providers have thrived where Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispensers are provided—making alerts simple while managing administrative tasks. Individuals obtain customized usage reports, facilitating growth within each unit-equipped sector. Management and billing purposes are well-maintained, and reports are delivered daily, weekly or during custom timeframes.

Where inventory managers are considered, automatic tracking optimizes inventory logging, making instant recording much more than a primary function. The Controlled Access Pharmaceutical Dispenser will likely become an industry constant within the future, redefining EMS services while assisting patients on-site, with complete accessibility, regulation and ease-of-use for industry professionals. The medical industry appears bright, and the CAP Dispenser is paving the way.

Source:

http://www.boundtreeuniversity.com/products/1084825-EMS-5-Controlled-Access-Pharmaceutical-Dispenser/
http://ems.pgpic.com/UCapIt_EMS5.pdf
http://bit.ly/1uCyxGO
http://ucapit.com/solutions.html
https://www.boundtree.com/ucapit.aspx